jet

 

  • A New Hawk T1 arrives at Cashmoor for a maiden flight on Saturday the 23rd February.  Dave Bright moves up from his slightly smaller version we have seen numerous times at the field to his 1/4 scale version by Airworld.

    Jetsmunt M200XBL (45lbs thrust) turbine.  2.34m span. 2.81m length. Powerbox Mercury, 12 JR Servos, Bound to his JR 12X radio. The maiden day was not an ideal day with a small amount of hazy sunshine but mainly grey skies and a light southerly crosswind

     More still images can be seen here in Dave's Gallery.

     

     

  • Edited down version of Dave Bright's first flight of his Bae Hawk on the 26 November 2016. It was extremely cold and overcast skies.  Not the best of days for first flights or maidens.  Earlier Jon Tappin took the sticks for it's maiden flight whilst the few members who braved out the chill watched, some with camera ready.

     

  • From the BVM stables of turbine jets comes an electric composite fast jet in kit form or ARF.  On the 30th August on an excellent day weatherwise, John brought up the field his new BVM electra fast jet.  We were surprised as John has become a bit of turbine fanatic in the last few years. John handed over the maiden flight to Jon who gave it a test flight.  Fairly quiet as EDF's go but open up the throttle and it moves very quick.  Gives camera men a difficult time keeping it in focus and view.

     

  • A very sleek low profile fast jet, the Carf Ultra Flash.  This jet covers a lot of sky very quickly and makes for impressive viewing.  Here on the 30th August 2018 Jon runs up the Ultra Flash for two flights over the day.  During a break he took on the sticks of another jet for it's first flight, a F15.  The Ultra flash is acomposite airframe, air retracts and powered by a Jet Munts 140 turbine.

     

  • Turbine

     For many the turbine powered jet needs a deep pocket and also the experience of many hours of RC flying.  Although airframes have come down somewhat in price and vary between traditional balsa - ply construction and the more popular composite construction, the latter strong but light. We will talk about foam later.

    A few of our members have turbine powered jets and attract a lot of attention when they are present up at Cashmoor.  The smell of kerosene and the whine of a turbine is something to enjoy.

    Turbine power requires a lot of avionics on board to enable the model to fly.  Safety devices to cut off the highly imflammable fuel or a onboard fire.  Pumps and regulators all add to the expense and that is not including the fuel which is burnt at an alarming rate.  A gallon doesn't last long but that 8 - 10 minute flight is something to behold and enjoy.  An adrenalin rush to appreciate!

     

  • Wimborne MAC's annual EDF & Jet plus the previously cancelled Opn Scale Day.  Dry this time round although the wind was challenging at around 14mph but at least was blowing down the strip from the west.  Lot's of different models to view and many pilots opted to fly.  Lot's of banter and  laughs thoughout the day.

    Thanks go to David as Master of Ceremonies, Stuart for presenting the awards, Colin for assisting with pilot logging and issuing voting slips after the pilots first flight. Only pliots who opted to fly were able to vote on the various categories covering scale, flying and best overall.

     

  • WimborneMAC’s annual EDF & Jet day took place on Sunday 2nd October. It promised to be an excellent day with fine weather and light winds. I arrived at 0820 hrs to put up the safety fence, I had already mown the airstrip in advance on the previous Wednesday. David Tappin, event director arrived a few minutes later and got tables and equipment ready.

    By 9 am members were starting to arrive and getting set up with their models. Those without any form of jet would also get some flying time in although jets and EDF’s get priority. Surprisingly for the the first time ever I can recall, the turbines five of which flew many times plus 3 others which only didn't feature in the following competition results because they didn't fly, outnumbered the EDFs

     

  • The annual Jet Day earlier was postponed due to poor weather conditions and was given the new date of September 23rd.  Generally a bright blue sky but with a "breezy" crosswind howling in from the SSW.  However, this time we were not to be beaten and all pilots got at least two flights in.  Due to crosswind though some members decided to stay away so numbers were down a little.  We had a few edf foamies of which only five flew, the classic F86 of Dave R burned out it's speed controller again, but we had the sight of two Me 163 Komets flying in formation - sort of!

    Jets actually flown were two turbine sport jet models plus a Bae Hawk, De Havilland Venom, F9F Panther and Jiri's new L39 Albatros.

     

  • This is an assembly and customisation article of this popular and sleek military trainer from Sebart.  The model comes in three variations of colours.  The model featured is the third generation, version 3 which has all metal retracts.  The earlier versions were plastic and caused many pilots grief, modifications were mad eon theMKII but many swapped out their retracts for E-flite trike sets with anti-jam feature adding around £120 to the cost of the model. Sebart's third genration has all metal retractsand uses a sequencer circuit to operate the gear. On the sequencer there are two spare pins which  can be used for other items that need to be switched when the gear is triggered. Landing lights?

     However, in this article I am upping the scale looks with a super looking prop just like it's full size counterpart and some customisation.  Some info on the real beast first.

     

  • Scale Day 2 was blessed with a bright sunny September Sunday after the washout of previous Saturday. Quite a reasonable turnout although more pilots were expected. Numbers may have been down due to holidays. We had members from Salisbury MFC and Wincanton too. Unfortunately, due to a lack of a tug after an issue on Slim Gregory Day we did not have any scale glider models arrive on site. However, a number of members just came to watch the flying and picnic including friendly banter. There were also a couple of visitors and families who seeing the road signs came up to watch too.

    With quite a wide range of models flying there was eyecandy for everyone. From WW1 biplanes, British and German to WWII fighters, the venerable Spitfire and the P47 Jug (on it's maiden flight) to Korean and Cold War jets.