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11 Apr 2021 15:51 #24487 by Brian Jackson
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Working on the Kadet's cowl was a bit of a challenge today. The bright clear and very cold morning went through some rapid changes, one being warm and sunny and one being in the middle of a sleet storm. With one eye on the weather and the other on the cowling, I carved the approximate shape with my long bladed "prop carver" from my free flight rubber years. The final contours were completed using a Perma-Grit block sander. Three coats of sanding sealer and a final rub down with 320 grit paper and the cowl is ready to be tissue covered to match the rest of the fuselage. I should have marked the cowl parts with a pencil, I used an old ball point pen, and it shows!
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25 Apr 2021 15:46 #24577 by Brian Jackson
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Fortunately the wind on Saturday wasn't blowing in my garden so I was able to begin the final touches to the Kadet. After a lot of frustration with being completely unable to set up a Spektrum receiver with AS3X, it was plugged in to my laptop as the instructions said, but there was no way I could get the stabilising part of the thing to work. Then I swapped it for an AR 8000, bit of an overkill for the Kadet, but as it turned out, a complete waste of time. I think this receiver is a cheap copy and not a genuine item at all. Wish I'd kept the packaging now. Completely different story with a well used Spektrum AR 6210, now the Kadet has a set of working controls at last. The OSFS .40 was fired up, ran it up and set the tick over, adjusted the main needle for full throttle, set the throttle cut and checked the fail safe. Next Tuesday looks possible for a maiden, so in the meantime I'll recharge all the batteries, put some new fuel into the field container, check spare plug and props and try not to get too nervous by Tuesday.
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25 Apr 2021 16:15 #24578 by Phillip Ford
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Looking forward to seeing it fly at last - been a loooong time coming....:lol:

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26 Apr 2021 16:47 #24586 by Brian Jackson
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Moving on to the next "easy to fix" project, I've started refurbishing the Panic I was given last Summer. I did some basic structural repairs last year, just enough to make it flyable with some degree of safety. The covering is/was quite remarkable, the original appeared to be covered in translucent multi coloured pieces. Unfortunately oil had got between the pieces, and the covering was peeling off. The previous owner had coated the upper surfaces dark olive green and the underside pale grey, it looked OK from a distance, but oil had done its wicked work and around the edges the paint was semi liquid. I read up about getting oil out of balsa, didn't sound promising. After stripping all the covering from the fuselage and tail unit, I scrubbed the surfaces with alcohol and lots of kitchen paper. Heated the surfaces using a heat gun and more scrubbing with kitchen paper. After several goes, the surfaces were improved quite a bit. After lightly sanding down, I scrubbed a coat of ordinary spirit based knotting well into the balsa using a stiff brush. Next day, after another light sanding, I brushed on a coat of thinned PVA. I shall leave it for a couple of days to dry right out. In the meantime I needed to replace the elevator and rudder hinges. These were fibreglass/superglue jobs and were definitely "in for the duration". They didn't respond too well to my attempts with a balsa knife, but they yielded instantly when attacked with a thin diamond disc in a Dremel, bit smelly and best done in the open air.
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27 Apr 2021 21:46 #24588 by Brian Jackson
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The main subject of this thread... the SIG Kadet was finally introduced to the open sky of Cashmoor today. After an assortment of things happening, the main needle became "self adjusting" while the engine was running, rather odd as it seemed to be OK previously. A small adjustment to the detent cured that problem, then after several attempts to start the engine, finally the correct adjustments gave reliable running. After a fairly short take off run, the Kadet lifted off and flew . A couple of clicks of aileron adjustment had the model flying straight and level at half throttle. I was concerned that the relatively small aileron movement I'd built in would cause a problem, it turned out that the Kadet only needs a tiny input to roll quite firmly. The elevator is quite sensitive as well, but the model flies nicely using the throttle to maintain altitude. Altogether a nice model to fly and adding ailerons was a definite bonus.
There were some problems after the first flight, fortunately there were club members to help and advise. It has been a long adventure from the initial downloading of the plan from Outer Zone on 21st March 2020, to the maiden flight of today, all in all, a most rewarding project.
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28 Apr 2021 06:30 #24589 by Simon Osborne
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And great to see you didn’t have to PANIC at all Brian!

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29 Apr 2021 17:40 #24597 by Brian Jackson
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I didn't "Panic" Simon, mainly due to the fact that I was rigid with fear.
The Kadet has been wiped down, tank drained, engine's had a squirt of "after run" and the Rx battery is charged. Surprisingly little mess from the OS FS .40, just a light spatter of oil on the LE of the right wing and a misting of oil on the right tail plane LE.
The Panic has dried out quite nicely, hopefully the application of a coat of knotting will work. The back end of the fuselage and the tail unit were lightly oil soaked, but I gave it the knotting treatment anyway. Today I covered the rudder and elevator without anything unpleasant happening. One good thing about covering a Panic, more or less anything goes. I've lots of leftover bits of covering material from models long gone, the Panic is the ideal way to use them up. Funny thing is, although a model might look gaudy on the ground, when its in the air, most of the time it appears as a dark shape, and sometimes that "dark shape" can be confusing, especially when you think its turning left when in fact its turning right and flying away from you. That was when I found it would be a "good thing" to have plenty of height.
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22 May 2021 11:14 - 22 May 2021 11:15 #24678 by Brian Jackson
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I finished re-hinging the rudder and elevator on the Panic, then I thought it might be useful if I showed the way I did it. This goes back a few years to the days of Channel 4 models. I went in to get some Pacer hinge glue, water based, easy to use and easy to clean up. Tiny bottle. Very expensive. John in Channel 4 told me that Pacer had discontinued it. I wondered why as it had become quite popular in a short time. I e-mailed Pacer thinking they probably wouldn't bother answering such a trivial question. Several days later I received a reply from Pacer's tech department. The reason they didn't make the glue was due to the fact that canny American modellers had found that Pacer Canopy glue did the same job at a fraction of the price. My hinging method is to drill a 2.0mm to 2.5mm hole in the centre of where the slot is to be made, the hole is only drilled half the depth of the hinge. Make the hinge slot, centring the jig on the hole. Clean out the slot as usual. Using R/C modeller's Glue from DeLuxe Materials, squeeze the glue into the slot via the drilled hole. This is not my idea, it was a suggestion from the people at Pacer.
I've never had a hinge fall out.......yet!
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22 May 2021 11:28 #24679 by Brian Jackson
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The fuselage of the Panic is almost ready to go. The de-oiling seems to have worked so far. The covering was no problem, and for extra protection I've slopped fuel proofer over it. The Panic had an "interesting" colour scheme when I collected it last year, olive drab top and light grey undersides. I re-covered the undersides of both wings during vital repairs that were needed. Now I've used up most of my scrap covering material, I don't want to break open a new roll as there are other models in the queue and I don't want to risk running short. I wondered if the drab paint could be stripped, it wasn't oil proof and was coming off in patches on the exhaust side of the model. I tested a spot with acetone and a toothbrush, bit fiddly but it came off alright and left the covering undamaged. My method is to slop acetone over the area to be stripped, then cover the area with the polythene backing from Solarfilm.
Leave it for ten minutes or so, the paint comes off quite easily with gentle scrubbing and a final wipe over with an acetone dampened wad of kitchen paper. All done in my open air workshop. One bonus I didn't expect was the local squirrels don't like the smell of acetone and kept well out of the way.
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27 May 2021 18:04 #24693 by Brian Jackson
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I had intended to fly today, however Virgin Media decided I'd be better off without a 'phone and better than that without a mobile as well. Finally they promised an engineer would call, I got a text message late this afternoon. They're coming tomorrow. I needed to keep myself busy, however stripping the olive drab off the Panic's upper wing didn't appeal, even though the result on the lower wing looks quite nice.
In desperation to get something totally absorbing I started tinkering with a tiny electric model I was given when helping clear Peter Wallis' models a couple of weeks a go. Its a small model which I thought might be a "Das Mini Stik". The airframe looked fairly sound, apart from a wonky tail unit and signs of an undercarriage being torn off. I made an undercart mounting from 6mm ply and a couple of small blocks made from leftover beech engine bearer. A vertical hole was drilled through each block and the ply mounting, then the whole assembly was grafted to the fuselage. I bent up two undercarriage legs from 3mm wire, I'd completely forgotten how easy modern wire bends compared with the genuine "Piano Wire" of long ago. The legs were secured with wide slotted saddle clamps, I had three, fortunate as I broke one while fitting it. A couple of lightweight wheels finished the job. The wonky tail took a while to persuade it to leave the fuselage. Peeling off the covering from the fuselage showed signs of damage, I cut the old glue away and re-established a flat surface ready for gluing. I removed the push rods from the elevator and rudder, these weren't adjustable as they had a "Z" bend at one end and a right angled bend at the other. I cut off each end folded one end of the wire back on itself and soldered it into a 2mm standard clevis. At the servo end I'll use connectors attached to the servo arms.
Didn't turn out to be a bad day really, but I'd rather have had a working 'phone and gone to Cashmoor.
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